2030 Agenda and CRPD training in Bolivia

From 11 to 13 August, I co-facilitated a workshop in Cochabamba, Bolivia with our partner Victor Baute from Venezuela who represented RIADIS. The workshop focused on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the inclusion of persons with disabilities in line with the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).

The workshop was the first of its kind in Bolivia for organizations of persons with disabilities (DPOs). The enthusiasm and interest from participants in learning about the 2030 Agenda and its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in line with the Convention was quite evident. In addition, Carla Caceres from CBM in Bolivia attended the workshop, as well as other supporting NGOs, including MyRight and ADD. Since Bolivia is a priority country for CBM, the workshop was especially well linked to our focus on global advocacy and national programmatic work on disability-inclusive development.

Alt="Victor Baute presenting the SDGs and CRPD"

Victor Baute presenting the SDGs and CRPD

The workshop was organized by ASHICO, the Association of Hard of Hearing Persons in Cochabamba and member of RIADIS. Thirty DPO representatives attended the participatory workshop from national, municipal, and community-based DPOs from all over Bolivia.

The workshop was inclusive and diverse with representation from Indigenous persons with disabilities, women with disabilities, youth with disabilities, persons with psychosocial disabilities, self-advocates, Little People, persons with disabilities in sports, Deaf persons, Blind persons, persons with low vision, hard of hearing persons, persons with physical disabilities, and families with children with disabilities. Victor lead the facilitation and received positive feedback on being a role model for the Deaf community and persons with disabilities in Bolivia and the region.

Participants shared the myriad barriers and challenges for persons with disabilities in Bolivia. An overarching challenge is that there are many norms and laws in Bolivia for persons with disabilities, but these are only on paper and unfortunately not implemented. Moreover, there is a missing connection between the technical expertise from the UN and the national level in Bolivia in terms of the CRPD and its implementation. In Bolivia, it is at the municipal level where disability laws are implemented and there is real impact.

Alt="Anibal Subirana from Federación Boliviana de Sordos (Bolivian Deaf Federation) presenting"

Anibal Subirana from Federación Boliviana de Sordos (Bolivian Deaf Federation) presenting

The top priorities for persons with disabilities in Bolivia that emerged from group work included:

  • Goal 4: Quality Education, Goal 3: Good Health and Well-being, and Goal 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth.
  • Followed by, Goal 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities, Goal 1: No Poverty, Goal 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions, and Goal 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure.

 

 

Participants were keen to learn and understand more about the 2030 Agenda and how it links to the Convention. As a result, the level of awareness significantly grew by day 3, as the photo below indicates. With this awareness, the group produced next steps as outcomes, including:

ALt="Participants’ level of awareness on the CRPD, 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, and the national disability law from day 1 to 3"

Participants’ level of awareness on the CRPD, 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, and the national disability law from day 1 to 3

  • The disability community in Bolivia will work to be more united and have shared messages to advocate to the government for CRPD and SDG implementation.
  • Participants will replicate this training and what they learned in the countryside and other remote parts of Bolivia to a variety of disability organizations and communities.
  • A group of participants will replicate and share what they learned from the workshop every month in Cochabamba for persons with disabilities.

 

  • The group proposed that there be a follow-up training in a year to assess what has been disseminated and realized in that time throughout the disability community in Bolivia.

I look forward to working more with the DPOs and partners in Bolivia!

ALt="Olivia Ojopi and Mayra Borda from the Association of Little People in Bolivia with Victor Baute from RIADIS and me"

Olivia Ojopi and Mayra Borda from the Association of Little People in Bolivia with Victor Baute from RIADIS and me

HLPF 2017: leaving no one behind

The 2017 High-level Political Forum (HLPF) took place from 10-19, with an additional day for the General Debate on 20 July, at the United Nations in New York. The HLPF represents the global platform on the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) annually in July. The theme for this year’s HLPF was “Eradicating poverty and promoting prosperity in a changing world.” The set of Goals that were reviewed in depth were the following, including Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development, that is considered each year:

  • Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
  • Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
  • Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
  • Goal 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
  • Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation
  • Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development

Alba Gonzalez (IAA) and I (IAA) actively participated in the Forum and supported partners, including Risna Utami (Indonesia), Pratima Gurung (Nepal), Gabriel Ismael Soto Vadillo, RIADIS (Uruguay), and Judith Umoh (Nigeria), and others. Overall, more than 50 persons with disabilities and partners attended the HLPF and represented the Stakeholder Group of Persons with Disabilities.

Alt="DPO partners attending the HLPF"

DPO partners attending the HLPF

During the first week, persons with disabilities presented on behalf of the Stakeholder Group of Persons with Disabilities in approximately 85 percent of the thematic discussions of the aforementioned Goals. This provided visibility for the disability movement and highlighted the situation of persons with disabilities at the national level. You can read the policy briefs here that the Stakeholder Group of Persons with Disabilities compiled on the Goals of focus.

During the second week, 44 countries reported on national SDG implementation and presented their voluntary national reviews. The situation of persons with disabilities were referenced in the majority of these oral presentations and participants were able to ask specific country-focused questions on behalf of civil society seven times, including Indonesia, Jordan, Argentina, Uruguay, Ethiopia (twice), and Denmark.

Also during the second week, I supported Colin Allen, Chair of IDA and President of the World Federation of the Deaf, in the Partnership Exchange in which he presented on the IDA and IDDC Partnership for SDGs. Colin stole the show and gave a stellar presentation on this unique partnership in the UN General Assembly Hall! We will continue to build on this partnership as SDG implementation continues.

Alt="Colin Allen at the Partnership Exchange"

Colin Allen at the Partnership Exchange

At the end of the HLPF, the Ministerial Declaration was adopted and includes five references to persons with disabilities in the areas of poverty eradication, implementation of nationally appropriate social protection floors, addressing the multiple forms of discrimination faced by women and girls, collection and coordination of data collection, and the need to localize the SDGs by reaching out to all stakeholders including subnational and local authorities.

This year’s HLPF was accessible in myriad ways, including CART from 10-20 July, International Sign in the VNR sessions and General Debate from 17-19, an accessible sustainable development knowledge platform website, access to roaming microphones and listening devices, accessible seating for presenters and wheelchair users, and more. I would like to give a big thank you to all of the UN staff who worked with me on making the HLPF accessible for persons with disabilities and I hope we can build on this excellent example of inclusion and leaving no one behind.

It is estimated that 70 countries will volunteer to give national reviews at the 2018 HLPF, so this is an area of increased interest and development. Positively, persons with disabilities were incredibly organized and visible in this forum and we can continue to strengthen this work for the inclusion of persons with disabilities in SDG implementation at the local, national, regional, and global levels.

Additional Information

Click here for more information on the 2017 HLPF.

The High-level Political Forum kicks off!

Tomorrow the High-level Political Forum (HLPF) 2017 kicks off at the United Nations in New York until 19 July. The HLPF is the global platform on the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its Sustainable Development Goals. The theme for this year’s HLPF is “Eradicating poverty and promoting prosperity in a changing world.” The set of Goals to be reviewed in depth will be the following, including Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development, that will be considered each year:

  • Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
  • Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
  • Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
  • Goal 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
  • Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation
  • Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development

You can read the policy briefs here that the Stakeholder Group of Persons with Disabilities compiled on the Goals of focus.

During the second week, 44 countries will report on national SDG implementation and present their voluntary national reviews. At the national level, CBM has been very active in supporting the inclusion of persons with disabilities in the consultation process, including in Bangladesh, Indonesia, Nepal, and Togo. Thank you to all the stellar support and collaboration from the CBM national offices in this process.

From CBM, Alba Gonzalez (IAA) and I (IAA) will actively participate in the Forum. In addition, quite a few of our partners will be attending, including Risna Utami (Indonesia), Pratima Gurung (Nepal), Gabriel Ismael Soto Vadillo, RIADIS (Uruguay), and Judith Umoh (Nigeria). Overall, more than 50 persons with disabilities and allies are attending the HLPF and will represent the Stakeholder Group of Persons with Disabilities.

For updates throughout the next two weeks please follow us on Twitter @LockwoodEM and @AlbaGonzalezAG and also at #InclusiveSDGs.

Data for People

Data for Development in AfricaTogether with CBM’s Country Representative for Kenya, David Munyendo, I had the pleasure of attending the High-Level meeting entitled “Data for Development in Africa – Unleashing the Power of Data and Partnerships Across Africa” on 29th and 30th in Nairobi. That event was co-hosted by the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data, the Governments of Kenya and Sierra Leone, and Safaricom. It brought together more than 400 representatives from Governments, UN Agencies, the Private Sector, Civil Society and Academia. All of these different actors came together united by the vision to contribute to the often quoted data revolution that should benefit those who are currently most marginalised.

And this is where disability comes into the picture! In fact, whereas this was the biggest meeting of that kind in Africa, the CBM team in Kenya had advocated for inclusion of persons with disabilities in the data debates over the last few years, and with success! CBM was one of the few disability and development NGOs being invited to the meeting.

 

During the course of the two days, a number of key messages emerged:

  1. The world needs more and better data, in order for decision-makers to design good policies and programmes.
  2. But data are not only for decision-makers, they are equally important for people and their daily life. For example, more reliable data on weather conditions can help farmers to decide when to plant, a massive potential gain in terms of food security and livelihood.
  3. There are many good initiatives and innovations regarding data, but it is now vital to bring these together, in order to maximize their potential. The meeting showed a great deal of political commitment by many actors to improve investments in data, but illustrated also a growing number of concrete initiatives that already exist including at the grassroots. For CBM, the data revolution will continue to be an important topic, not only in promoting the inclusion of persons with disabilities in such political debates, but also very concretely in our programmatic work. From my point of view, it would be desirable to show case             at upcoming meetings of a similar nature CBM and its partners’ projects that highlight how data disaggregated by disability helped to improve e.g. educational services at community level. Because it is really at that level that data should make a difference!