Author Archives: Elizabeth Lockwood

Elizabeth Lockwood

About Elizabeth Lockwood

Elizabeth Lockwood is the CBM Representative at the United Nations in New York. Elizabeth focuses on developing advocacy strategies to raise awareness, network, build capacity, and lobby for the rights of persons with disabilities at the UN level in relation to the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and Inclusive Development. She also coordinates efforts of mainstreaming persons with disabilities in Agenda 2030 and conducts research and writes briefs to assist with strategies for the inclusion of persons with disabilities. Elizabeth has lived and worked in North America, South America, Europe, Asia, and the Navajo Nation engaging in disability-focused grassroots activism and broader policymaking with emphasis on inclusive strategies and systematic change through advocacy, collaboration, and awareness. She holds a Ph.D. in Disability Studies and is fluent in Spanish and five sign languages.

One more step in the global indicator framework

On 7 June, the UN Economic and Social Council formally adopted the global Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) indicator framework at their Coordination and Management Meeting. The next step is that the global framework will be presented at the UN General Assembly for adoption in September, which is needed for full adoption of the framework.

The global indicator framework is important for persons with disabilities, as data collection can provide the number of persons with disabilities living in a location, the barriers they encounter, and what policies and programs are needed to eradicate those barriers. Disaggregation of data by disability is a key step in including persons with disabilities who encounter higher rates of poverty and exclusion from society. The global indicator framework is important at the local and national levels where SDG implementation takes place, and is linked to our CBM programs in the areas of inclusive education, ensuring healthy lives, water and sanitation for all, gender equality, climate change, inclusive cities among other areas.

Furthermore, the framework can be used as a guide for monitoring the SDGs and can be a tool for disability-inclusive development since 11 indicators have references to persons with disabilities. These indicators are in the areas of poverty eradication, education (2 references), employment (2 references), reducing inequalities, sustainable and inclusive cities (3 references), and peaceful and inclusive societies (2 references). In addition, the paragraph on disaggregation includes disaggregation of data by disability.

Each indicator is ranked in a tier system with three tiers:

  • Tier 1: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, and data are regularly produced by countries for at least 50 per cent of countries and of the population in every region where the indicator is relevant.
  • Tier 2: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, but data are not regularly produced by countries.
  • Tier 3: No internationally established methodology or standards are yet available for the indicator, but methodology/standards are being (or will be) developed or tested.

The disability-inclusive indicators are mostly found in Tier III (5) and Tier II (4), with only one in Tier I. There is one indicator that could be in any three of the Tiers depending on the indices.

Stay tuned for updates on the global indicator framework, and know that this is one step closer to ensuring that no one is left behind and building a more inclusive society.

Additional Information

Disability Statistics: Our Place in the Sun

The 10th Conference of the States Parties to the CRPD

Next week the 10th Conference of States Parties to the CRPD will take place at the UN in New York from 13-15 June. In conjunction, the CRPD Civil Society Forum will take place one day prior on 12 June and the DESA Forum on the day afterward on 16 June. The theme of this year’s COSP is “The Second Decade of the CRPD: Inclusion and full participation of persons with disabilities and their representative organizations in the implementation of the Convention.”

Sub-themes include:

  • Addressing the impact of multiple discrimination on persons with disabilities and promoting their participation and multi-stakeholder partnerships for achieving the SDGs in line with the CRPD;
  • Inclusion and full participation of persons with disabilities in humanitarian action; and
  • Promoting inclusive urban development and implementation of the New Urban Agenda –  Habitat III

The COSP Bureau includes: President: Bulgaria (Eastern European Group) and Vice-Presidents: Tunisia (African Group), Sri Lanka (Asia-Pacific Group), Ecuador (Latin American and Caribbean Group) and Germany (Western European and Others Group)

CBM will have a strong presence this year with participation from Jane Edge, CEO CBM Australia; Sarah Meschenmoser, CBM Germany; Mirjam Gasser, CBM Switzerland; Diane Kingston, CBM International, IAA; Risna Utami, our partner from Indonesia; and me, CBM International, IAA.

Additionally, we will have an exhibition space inside the UN entitled “Leave no one behind: Disability-Inclusive Development through the CRPD and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development” with CBM publications, brochures and postcards demonstrating how CBM engages in promoting the rights of persons with disabilities in international cooperation through the CRPD and the 2030 Agenda. Moreover, our table will be situated alongside the exhibition of the CBM International, Handicap International and the International Disability Alliance project that is promoting inclusive humanitarian action for persons with disabilities. If you’re around, please stop by and say hi!

In addition, we are co-hosting and co-organizing two events:

  • 1:15-2:30 Tuesday 13 June – Persons with disabilities on the move: The rights of refugees and migrants with disabilities Conference Room 4 (Inclusion International, CBM, and Handicap International co-sponsoring with International Disability Alliance, OHCHR, UNHCR, UNICEF, European Disability Forum, EESC, Human Rights Watch) (CBM is co-sponsoring)
  • 11:45-1:00 Wednesday 14 June – Nothing about us without us: Enhancing participation of persons with disabilities in political and public life in Asia & Europe, Conference Room 11 (CBM, International Disability Alliance and Asia-Europe Foundation) (CBM is co-organizing and co-sponsoring)

Furthermore, Diane and I will participate in the following events:

Diane:

  • 13 June at 1:15 on people with disabilities on the move – moderating
  • 13 June at 3:00 on mental health and human rights – moderating
  • 14 June at 11:45 on political participation – moderating
  • 14 June at 6:15 on women and election to CRPD committee (Women Enabled) speaker

Elizabeth:

  • 14 June at 4:45 on Accessibility Issues for Hard of Hearing Persons [International Federation of Hard of Hearing People (IFHOH) and the International Disability Alliance (IDA)]

Stay tuned for more news and information throughout the week and follow us on Twitter for real-time updates: @LockwoodEM, @Diane_CBM, @JaneDEdge, @risnawati_utami

Financing for Development: ensuring the inclusion and participation of those furthest behind

The ECOSOC Forum on Financing for Development follow-up (FfD Forum) concluded today with 20 ministers, UN and non-UN entities, as well as civil society and business sectors in attendance during the week.

The four-day Forum contained a two-day ministerial segment followed by a two-day expert segment. The FfD Forum resulted in inter-governmentally agreed conclusions and recommendations that will feed into the overall follow-up and review of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in the High-level Political Forum (HLPF) on Sustainable Development. The outcome document was adopted on 23 May and includes leave-no-one-behind language, specifically “We recommit to ensuring that no country or person is left behind and to focusing our efforts where the challenges are greatest, including by ensuring the inclusion and participation of those who are furthest behind (para 3)” and “We reaffirm that achieving gender equality, empowering all women and girls” (para 5). These important principles are central to our work in CBM of reaching the most marginalized and empowering women and girls with disabilities to create a more inclusive society.

Additionally, the IATF Report was officially launched during the Forum. Fifty agencies participate in the Report, which is very global in nature and extends beyond the UN, including inputs from the International Monetary Fund, World Bank and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. It is the major input into the FfD Forum, although other inputs are also included. The 2017 Report contains 9 references to persons with disabilities, including a reference to the Washington Group on Disability Statistics. For details, take a look at the 2017 IATF Report.

The theme of leave no one behind, especially the most often left behind, was highlighted throughout the Forum from UN DESA, UNDP, the EU and many more presenters. Germany explicitly included persons with disabilities in their intervention and highlighted that women, children, and persons with disabilities are the most affected groups in terms of inequalities in financing for development, and emphasized the importance of disaggregation of data by disability in financing for development to adequately address inequalities.

Additionally, as a positive outcome of broad civil society collaboration, the CSO FfD Group included accessibility and persons with disabilities in their intervention on inequality and growth and again in the session devoted to the country statements after the adoption of the FfD Outcome Document. Furthermore, persons with disabilities were included various times in the stakeholder dialogue, as well as in many side events.

Alt="Three members of the CSO Financing for Development Group at the Forum"

Three members of the CSO Financing for Development Group at the Forum

During the compelling side event focused on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality in Development Finance, Bruno Rios from the Permanent Mission of Mexico to the UN highlighted that women and girls with disabilities are a priority for Mexico and furthermore gave the example of the Marrakesh Treaty as a successful example of collaboration between Member States, public and private sectors to jointly set standards for accessible documents for people who are blind, visually impaired or otherwise print disabled.

The Way Forward

The IATF on financing for development will issue the unedited version of its 2018 report no later than the end of February 2018, to be updated with the latest data upon its release, in order to facilitate the timely preparation of the draft conclusions and recommendations.

The third ECOSOC Forum on Financing for Development follow-up will convene from 23 to 26 April 2018 in New York, and will include the special high-level meeting with the Bretton Woods institutions, World Trade Organization and the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development. Next year’s modalities will be the same modalities that applied to this year’s Forum.

We will continue to be active in the CSO Financing for Development (FfD) Group. Keep tuned for the future FfD process.

 

Additional Information

Read here and here for more details on the Forum, here for information on FfD processes, and additional information can be found in the Stakeholder Group of Persons with Disabilities Position Paper for 2017 Financing for Development Forum.

Financing for Development: leave no one behind

The ECOSOC Forum on Financing for Development follow-up (FfD Forum) kicked off today at the United Nations Headquarters in New York. The FfD Forum is an inter-governmental process with universal participation mandated to review the Addis Ababa Action Agenda (Addis Agenda) and other financing for development outcomes and the means of implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Financing of the SDGs is a key and central theme to current global sustainable development, as well intrinsically linked to our work in CBM. It is particularly relevant at local and national levels in the areas of inclusive education, ensuring healthy lives, water and sanitation for all, gender equality, climate change, inclusive cities among other areas.

The four-day Forum is taking place from 22-25 May, beginning with a two-day ministerial segment and followed by a two-day expert segment. The FfD Forum results in inter-governmentally agreed conclusions and recommendations that are fed into the overall follow-up and review of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in the High-level Political Forum (HLPF) on Sustainable Development.

The FfD process is important and unique as it is open ended, unlike the 2030 Agenda that has an end date of 2030. Moreover, the FfD Forum is not purely a UN meeting, but also includes non-UN entities, including the Bretton Woods institutions, WTO and UNCTAD indicating a shared space for collaboration with UN and non-UN organizations and institutions.

The theme of leave no one behind, especially the most often left behind, was highlighted throughout the first day, including Mr. Wu Hongbo, Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs who launched the 2017 IATF Report that contains 9 references to persons with disabilities. Additionally, Mr. Tegegnework Gettu of UNDP highlighted the inclusion of the most “vulnerable” in Financing for Development follow-up.

The EU called to ensure that no one is left behind and for gender equality in financing for development and Germany explicitly included persons with disabilities in their intervention. Specifically, during the segment on inequalities and inclusive growth, H.E. Mr. Juergen Schulz, Vice President of ECOSOC (Germany) highlighted that women, children, and persons with disabilities are the most affected groups in terms of inequalities in financing for development. In addition, he emphasized the importance of disaggregation of data by disability in financing for development to adequately address inequalities.

Alt="CSO FfD Group preparing for the FfD Forum"

CSO FfD Group preparing for the FfD Forum

Further, as a positive outcome of broad civil society collaboration, the CSO FfD Group also included accessibility and persons with disabilities in their intervention on gender and women’s rights. Great teamwork everyone!

I’ll end with a quote from H.E. Mr. Frederick Musiiwa Makamure Shava, ECOSOC President, that “promises made, must be promises kept,” which is especially true to achieve a truly inclusive society and to leave no one behind.

Additional Information

Stakeholder Group of Persons with Disabilities Position Paper for 2017 Financing for Development Forum

Financing for Development Processes – Update 1