Tag Archives: disability inclusion

International Day of People with Disabilities: Include Us

This post has been written by Elle Spring is an Advocacy and Communications Officer at CBM Australia. Her passion is storytelling for change and she has recently returned from collecting stories of the lived experiences of people with disabilities in Vanuatu.

Globally, one billion people have a disability, and 80 per cent live in developing countries. In developing countries, women comprise three quarters of people with disabilities. Women and girls with disabilities are disproportionately represented and are often the furthest left behind.

To mark International Day of People with Disabilities (IDPD) on 3 December 2017, CBM has created a video to highlight their unique experience, the contributions they have to make, and the importance of including women and girls with disabilities in all development efforts.

 

Meet Nelly from Vanuatu; a leader, an advocate and the National Coordinator of Vanuatu Disability Promotion and Advocacy Association (VDPA) – the national Disabled People’s Organisation.

Nelly, the National Coordinator of Vanuatu Disability Promotion and Advocacy Association (VDPA)

Nelly, the National Coordinator of Vanuatu Disability Promotion and Advocacy Association (VDPA) ©Erin Johnson/CBM Australia

“I’m happy that I am a woman with disabilities and I am a leader…I’m not only advocating for me, but for my members as well.

However, this is not common. “In Vanuatu, you hardly see women with disabilities leading different organisations. It’s really hard because of the barriers they face.”

Women and girls with disabilities face multiple layers of discrimination; creating barriers which stop them from achieving their full potential.

“Women with disabilities face double, and most times triple discrimination, because they are a woman, and they have a disability, and the abuses they face or the discrimination they face in society.”

“When you come out from your house and someone is staring at you, its discrimination already and you feel like you’re not part of the community – that’s what our women and girls with disabilities are facing in the community.”

Women and girls with disabilities are often hidden away by families, excluded from decision-making – even about their own bodies – and are less likely to attend school than girls without disabilities. In developing countries just 32.9 per cent of girls with disabilities complete primary school.

“Most of our women and girls [with disabilities] have not had education, they are left at home.”

Without education, it makes securing formal employment far more difficult, especially when many women and girls with disabilities are unaware of their rights.

“Most women with disabilities, they are volunteers – they do work without any pay and we always advocate for their rights. If this lady did the same work as a woman without disability, you need to pay her the same amount.”

“Women and girls with disabilities should know their rights. They need to know they have the same rights as anyone else. They have to be empowered and live as anyone else.”

The United Nations (UN) theme for International Day of People with Disabilities this year is: Transformation towards sustainable and resilient society for all. It draws attention to the changes that must be made to ensure the 2030 Agenda – which aims to leave no one behind – can be realised. As former Secretary General of the UN, Ban Ki-moon stated:

To be truly transformative, the post-2015 development agenda must prioritise gender equality and women’s empowerment. The world will never realise 100 per cent of its goals if 50 per cent of its people cannot realise their full potential.

Without including women and girls with disabilities in all development efforts, the inclusive world envisioned by the 2030 Agenda cannot be achieved, and women and girls with disabilities will continue to be furthest left behind.

“We need to work towards a society that is inclusive, barrier-free and rights-based for all. Women with disabilities need to become leaders for tomorrow. We are agents of change.”

“If more women with disabilities are taking leadership positions and advocating for the rights of women and girls with disabilities, and all people with disabilities, I believe that we will not leave anyone behind. Include us!”

Fighting Neglected Tropical Diseases: The case for participation and human rights based approaches

This is an excerpt from a blog written by CBM Senior Advisor for Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) – KH Martin Kollmann for the International Coalition for Trachoma Control.

Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are causes and consequences of poverty, disability and marginalization. They disproportionately affect the world’s poorest communities and can have profound physical, mental, social and socioeconomic effects on those who lack the resources for prevention, treatment and care. Thus NTD programs can be viewed as an investment in the poorest and most marginalized communities and a critical step towards reaching the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Have a look at CBM’s Neglected Tropical Diseases Report 2017.

In order to achieve the SDGs we must ask ourselves how to best minimize the adverse effects of NTDs. What measures do we need to put in place to ensure those affected are not sentenced to poverty, marginalization, discrimination or exclusion?

Hint: Key answers lie in participation and human rights based approaches.

The involvement of communities and people affected is not a new concept in primary health care and disease programs. Many international human rights treaties explicitly state that all people have the right and duty to participate individually and collectively in the planning and implementation of their health care. However, the active participation of people affected by NTDs is not always a reality. Human rights based approaches to NTDs emphasize that any interventions should be based on the principles of participation, non-discrimination and accountability.

Treaties and conventions like the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities recognize and codify the rights of persons who are disabled, women, children, indigenous peoples and other marginalized groups. People with NTDs often fall into several of these mutually overlapping categories, which is why participatory and human rights based approaches are particularly relevant in the design and implementation of our programs and our advocacy work.

NTDs can cause chronic disability and are highly stigmatizing, which often leads to discrimination, marginalization and exclusion. In many countries, two thirds of persons with disabilities are unemployed and those who have jobs often only work part time. This is particularly true for people who experience advanced trachoma, the world’s leading infectious cause of visual impairment and blindness.

Trachoma, like other disabling NTDs, reduces economic productivity and increases social exclusion, which can cause family breakdowns and abandonment. As a result, many women, who are disproportionately affected by the disease, downplay or conceal visual impairment and pain for fear of exclusion or stigmatization. Similarly, other disabling NTDs can lead to severe stigma, associated mental health problems and social exclusion. These social consequences are often described by the affected as the greater disability.

76 year old Musamba (centre), who is blind from Onchocerciasis (River Blindness), receives Mectizan tablets from our project workers in DRC.

76 year old Musamba (centre), who is blind from Onchocerciasis (River Blindness), receives Mectizan tablets from our project workers in DRC.

Participatory and human rights based approaches, such as Disease Management Disability and Inclusion (DMDI), address these often-neglected aspects of NTD work as a crosscutting theme. They are guided by the principal that people and communities affected by NTDs are essential to the success of programs. Having experienced the disease, disability and associated discrimination, people affected by NTDs have a unique voice and perspective, they bring passion to the work and take the programs closer to the communities they are designed to benefit.

Placing persons affected by NTDs at the center of our program work requires a major paradigm shift, which has profound implications on how services are planned, delivered and evaluated. However, examples from the field have shown that when affected people and communities are given ownership to actively plan, implement and evaluate activities, it leads to better outcomes, improves cost-efficiency and enhances sustainability.

Participation and human rights based approaches are particularly relevant for the last mile of NTD elimination. By enhancing the recognition, systematic inclusion and valued participation of affected people and communities, these approaches assist in creating sustainable, comprehensive and inclusive NTD programs that are fully integrated into national health systems.

In 2015, the international community explicitly recognized the importance of NTDs, calling for their end in SDG 3.3. Moreover, through SDG 3.8 the international community reiterated its commitment to the equality and human rights of all people by including universal health coverage as a key goal – a principal that lies at the core of our NTD work. With over one billion of the world’s people affected by NTDs, it is clear that upholding these human rights will have to happen in a sustained and participatory approach if we are to achieve our goals with no one left behind. The NTD community should be at the forefront of making this a reality.

India to get new act for persons with disabilities

In a promising win for millions of persons with disabilities in India, a bill that had been pending for two years in Parliament was passed on the very last day of business for the Winter Session in the Lok Sabha on 16th December.

The bill paves the way for a new act for the rights of persons with disabilities and will replace the two-decade-old the Persons with Disabilities (Equal Opportunities, Protection of Rights and Full Participation) Act, 1995.

The news brought relief and ushered a wave of enthusiasm among disability organisations and activists who had been holding peaceful vigils over the past month or so to remind the parliamentarians that the bill should not get delayed for the next session. The Winter Session had witnessed stormy scenes resulting from divided opinions over the much discussed demonetisation move by the government.

A rare unity

It was heartening to see that members, cutting across party lines, decided to unite ensure that the much awaited bill is passed. The concensus also highlights the positive changes that have taken place since the Disability Act 2015 came into force with both the policymakers and political leadership in the country showing stronger concern for rights and participation of persons with disabilities.

In fact, the Lok Sabha, the lower house of Parliament, passed the bill within two hours after a short debate. Prime Minister Narendra Modi was also present in the house during this period. Earlier on Wednesday, the Rajya Sabha too had witnessed similar bonhomie for passage of The Rights of Persons with Disabilities Bill, 2014.

A new phase of empowerment

The bill ushers in a more progressive policy and legal framework for the government, organisations and persons with disabilities to achieve inclusion and equal rights for persons with disabilities.

“The New Act will bring our law in line with the United National Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD), to which India is a signatory. This will fulfill the obligations on the part of India in terms of UNCRD. Further, the new law will not only enhance the Rights and Entitlements of Divyangjan but also provide an effective mechanism for ensuring their empowerment and true inclusion into the Society in a satisfactory manner.” says a text from the Prime Minister’s official website.

Among the salient features of the bill is disability being defined as an evolving and dynamic concept and the types of disabilities being increased from seven to 21. It is important to underline that while some of the specific reservations and affirmative actions have been earmarked for persons with disabilities based on degree of disability defined in the law, the bill takes a much wider view of disability and the dynamic social group that it constitutes.

Though the 2011 national census identified 2.6 percent of India population constituting of people with disabilities, there has been a persistent demand for making a higher allocation of resources and reservation in jobs/education for persons with disabilities. Though the bill provides for reservation in vacancies in government establishments from the existing 3% to 4%, this is short of 5% that disabled peoples’ organisations were demanding.

Accessibility has emerged as a key policy and public campaign agenda for the government of India with its flagship Sugamya Bharat Abhiyan or Accessible India Campaign. The bill calls for strengthening the campaign and institutionalises this through a focus on accessibility in public buildings (both Government and private) in a prescribed time frame.

A provision that has generated mixed reactions is related to penal action mandated for offenses committed against persons with disabilities. The disabled peoples’ organisations feel that the wording of the statement related to it leaves a lot to subjective interpretation as it says ‘discrimination against a disabled person (would not be punishable) if it is a proportionate means of achieving a legitimate aim’.

The bill specifically mentions women and girls with disabilities and acknowledges that ‘special measures’ should be undertaken to protect the rights of women and children with disabilities.

The women’s rights groups, however, feel disappointed with the lack of specifics, as they had been asking for the incorporation of a separate subsection that would address the needs of women with disabilities following the guidelines set out by the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Read a summary of key provisions of The Rights of Persons with Disabilities Bill, 2014, on Prime Minister Modi’s web portal.

International Day of People with Disability: towards a barrier free reality

The International Day of Persons with Disabilities (IDPD), also known as World Disability Day is annually observed on 3 December each year. This Day aims to promote an awareness of disability issues and mobilise support for the dignity, rights and inclusion of persons with disabilities.

The blog piece below is attributed to CBM Australia.

 

Globally, there are one billion people with disabilities, and 80 per cent live in developing countries. People with disabilities often face barriers to inclusion in many aspects of daily life and these barriers can stop them from achieving their full potential.

To mark International Day of People with Disability, CBM Australia has created a video to illustrate some of these barriers and to show that we all have a role to play in making a barrier free word a reality for everyone.

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Watch video: A Barrier Free Reality

Barriers come in many forms, including those relating to the physical environment; or negative attitudes and discrimination; or lack of suitable access to information; or those resulting from discriminatory legislation or policy.

These barriers can often stop people with disabilities from gaining education and employment opportunities; accessing vital rehabilitation and healthcare; or participating fully in their communities.

Let’s take a closer look at Orsula from Timor-Leste. She was born with an impairment that affects her legs, making mobility more difficult for her. Orsula has faced many barriers to inclusion throughout her life; barriers to: education, employment, health care, and participation in her community.

Orsula from Timor-Leste © CBM Australia

Orsula from Timor-Leste © CBM Australia

From childhood she was left out of school, not because she wasn’t more than capable of learning.

“When I was a child my dad dropped me out of school because he was embarrassed with my condition. I saw my friends go to school and asked my dad if I could go back to school, but because my dad was afraid and worried that people would make fun of me, he didn’t let me go back”

Being left out of school creates a long lasting impact. When children with disabilities don’t attend school, they are more likely to live in poverty as an adult.

Despite not having the opportunity to gain an education, Orsula learned how to sew and works as a tailor to contribute to her family’s income.

“Even though I have a disability, I work as a tailor. I love sewing. I do this to earn some money for my children’s food.”

But like many people with disabilities, she often earns less for her work.

“Some people are kind, they give me $5 when I fix their clothes, but some are not. They give me just $1 or 50 cents. I feel sad when they do that. I can’t force them to give me higher pay.”

However, Orsula’s most significant barrier was caused by negative attitudes of health care providers.

“It happened with my first-born child. They [midwives] were just shocked when they saw me, and spoke to each other saying that I won’t be able to give birth naturally; they said it will be hard for me to push with my condition and I can’t take a big breath.”

Many didn’t believe that she was capable of delivering her children naturally, and even worse, some said she shouldn’t have children at all.

“My third and fourth children were only one year apart. Because they were exactly a year apart, they [nurses and midwives] were shocked and start verbally abusing me by saying “why does she want to have children all the time while she has this condition”. It hurt me when they said that.”

“They didn’t know what I am capable of. I am strong.”

While there are many barriers, we can work together to help break them down. One powerful way to do that relates to this year’s International Day of People with Disability theme: Achieving 17 goals for the future we want.

The theme is in recognition of the Sustainable Development Goals, commonly known as the Global Goals, which were adopted by world leaders in September 2015. These 17 goals aspire to pave the way to a world in 2030 where poverty is a thing of the past and no one is left behind.

Including people with disabilities in all 17 goals – goals such as health care, education and employment – will bring us closer to achieving the future we want. A future where barriers no longer stop people with disabilities from achieving their full potential.

For Orsula, her vision for the future is a world where negative attitudes are changed so that no women with disabilities will have to face the same discrimination and treatment that she faced when having children.

“If I were to have another baby then I hope that it is more accessible for people with disability. I hope the nurse will be more understandable and patient with us people with disability. I hope they change their attitudes towards people with disability.”

We all have a role to play in making a fairer, more inclusive, and ultimately, barrier free world a reality for everyone. What will your role be?

Working together to break down barriers © CBM Australia

Working together to break down barriers © CBM Australia