Tag Archives: SDGs

HLPF 2017: leaving no one behind

The 2017 High-level Political Forum (HLPF) took place from 10-19, with an additional day for the General Debate on 20 July, at the United Nations in New York. The HLPF represents the global platform on the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) annually in July. The theme for this year’s HLPF was “Eradicating poverty and promoting prosperity in a changing world.” The set of Goals that were reviewed in depth were the following, including Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development, that is considered each year:

  • Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
  • Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
  • Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
  • Goal 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
  • Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation
  • Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development

Alba Gonzalez (IAA) and I (IAA) actively participated in the Forum and supported partners, including Risna Utami (Indonesia), Pratima Gurung (Nepal), Gabriel Ismael Soto Vadillo, RIADIS (Uruguay), and Judith Umoh (Nigeria), and others. Overall, more than 50 persons with disabilities and partners attended the HLPF and represented the Stakeholder Group of Persons with Disabilities.

Alt="DPO partners attending the HLPF"

DPO partners attending the HLPF

During the first week, persons with disabilities presented on behalf of the Stakeholder Group of Persons with Disabilities in approximately 85 percent of the thematic discussions of the aforementioned Goals. This provided visibility for the disability movement and highlighted the situation of persons with disabilities at the national level. You can read the policy briefs here that the Stakeholder Group of Persons with Disabilities compiled on the Goals of focus.

During the second week, 44 countries reported on national SDG implementation and presented their voluntary national reviews. The situation of persons with disabilities were referenced in the majority of these oral presentations and participants were able to ask specific country-focused questions on behalf of civil society seven times, including Indonesia, Jordan, Argentina, Uruguay, Ethiopia (twice), and Denmark.

Also during the second week, I supported Colin Allen, Chair of IDA and President of the World Federation of the Deaf, in the Partnership Exchange in which he presented on the IDA and IDDC Partnership for SDGs. Colin stole the show and gave a stellar presentation on this unique partnership in the UN General Assembly Hall! We will continue to build on this partnership as SDG implementation continues.

Alt="Colin Allen at the Partnership Exchange"

Colin Allen at the Partnership Exchange

At the end of the HLPF, the Ministerial Declaration was adopted and includes five references to persons with disabilities in the areas of poverty eradication, implementation of nationally appropriate social protection floors, addressing the multiple forms of discrimination faced by women and girls, collection and coordination of data collection, and the need to localize the SDGs by reaching out to all stakeholders including subnational and local authorities.

This year’s HLPF was accessible in myriad ways, including CART from 10-20 July, International Sign in the VNR sessions and General Debate from 17-19, an accessible sustainable development knowledge platform website, access to roaming microphones and listening devices, accessible seating for presenters and wheelchair users, and more. I would like to give a big thank you to all of the UN staff who worked with me on making the HLPF accessible for persons with disabilities and I hope we can build on this excellent example of inclusion and leaving no one behind.

It is estimated that 70 countries will volunteer to give national reviews at the 2018 HLPF, so this is an area of increased interest and development. Positively, persons with disabilities were incredibly organized and visible in this forum and we can continue to strengthen this work for the inclusion of persons with disabilities in SDG implementation at the local, national, regional, and global levels.

Additional Information

Click here for more information on the 2017 HLPF.

The High-level Political Forum kicks off!

Tomorrow the High-level Political Forum (HLPF) 2017 kicks off at the United Nations in New York until 19 July. The HLPF is the global platform on the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its Sustainable Development Goals. The theme for this year’s HLPF is “Eradicating poverty and promoting prosperity in a changing world.” The set of Goals to be reviewed in depth will be the following, including Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development, that will be considered each year:

  • Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
  • Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
  • Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
  • Goal 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
  • Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation
  • Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development

You can read the policy briefs here that the Stakeholder Group of Persons with Disabilities compiled on the Goals of focus.

During the second week, 44 countries will report on national SDG implementation and present their voluntary national reviews. At the national level, CBM has been very active in supporting the inclusion of persons with disabilities in the consultation process, including in Bangladesh, Indonesia, Nepal, and Togo. Thank you to all the stellar support and collaboration from the CBM national offices in this process.

From CBM, Alba Gonzalez (IAA) and I (IAA) will actively participate in the Forum. In addition, quite a few of our partners will be attending, including Risna Utami (Indonesia), Pratima Gurung (Nepal), Gabriel Ismael Soto Vadillo, RIADIS (Uruguay), and Judith Umoh (Nigeria). Overall, more than 50 persons with disabilities and allies are attending the HLPF and will represent the Stakeholder Group of Persons with Disabilities.

For updates throughout the next two weeks please follow us on Twitter @LockwoodEM and @AlbaGonzalezAG and also at #InclusiveSDGs.

10th COSP in review

The 10th session of the Conference of States Parties to the CRPD (COSP) is officially over! This year was an important year as it was the 10th session of COSP and there was more activity than ever before with over 80 side events, numerous parallel events and receptions, as well as the civil society CRPD forum on Monday, 12 June. Moreover, for the first time, civil society and Member States were able to have exhibitions in the UN to raise awareness about the rights of persons with disabilities during the conference.

This year, there was a record number of presenters – approximately 130 –  during the General Debate, and in the Ministerial Segment, there were more than 20 high-level speakers, including the First Lady of Ecuador who opened the General Debate. Additionally, the round table discussions centered on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, commitments in the humanitarian area, and the New Urban Agenda

As CBM we were incredibly active with representatives from three Member Associations, International Advocacy and Alliances (IAA), and DPO partners. CBM colleagues included Jane Edge, CEO of CBM Australia; Sarah Meschenmoser, CBM Germany; Mirjam Gasser, CBM Switzerland; Diane Kingston, IAA; and me. In addition, IAA in New York supported Risna Utami from OHANA in Indonesia to attend COSP.

Alt="Mirjam Gasser presenting the official CBM statement"

Mirjam Gasser presenting the official CBM statement

Mirjam presented the official statement on behalf of CBM on 15 June highlighting our programmatic work, women with disabilities, and our engagement in the New Urban Agenda. She also moderated an event on political participation of persons with disabilities. Diane moderated and presented in numerous events and was part of an official COSP panel. I presented on the accessibility campaign I have led at the UN to ensure accessibility for persons with disabilities at the HLPF. Additionally, we co-sponsored two events and held an exhibition table for three days in which we shared publications on our programs and had engaging conversations.

Quite a few of CBM’s partners attended COSP and the following are the views they shared on the value of attending global UN events for national programs and work.

 

We have been supporting our partner, Risna Utami from OHANA in Indonesia, to attend COSP since 2014. Risna says that from this global advocacy at the UN level, she now has a strong influence in her government and that the top level – the Presidential Office –  now trusts her and consequently wants to make Indonesia more inclusive of persons with disabilities.

Alt="Risna and me at COSP"

Risna and me at COSP

Risna is actively involved with the CBM Indonesia office, as well as CBM Australia in which she carried out a DID training to Australian Embassy and DFAT staff in Jakarta.

Our partner Victor Baute from RIADIS and Venezuela also attended COSP this year. RIADIS and CBM-LARO have an MoU and plan to strengthen CBM’s linkages at the national level in the region. Similar to Risna, Victor has participated in BRIDGE trainings and subsequently has provided local workshops on the CRPD and the SDGs to Latin American DPOs and partners. Victor views COSP as a platform to learn about good practices and examples to replicate and improve on CRPD and SDG implementation, human rights mechanisms, and build upon international exchange and partnerships (SDG 17).

Alt="Our partner Rama Dhakal and Jane Edge CEO of CBM Australia at COSP"

Our partner Rama Dhakal and Jane Edge CEO of CBM Australia at COSP

Our partner Rama Dhakal from the National Association of the Physical Disabled – Nepal also attended the COSP. She is the immediate past president of Nepal disabled women’s association and has been a partner with CBM since 2010 when she worked with CBM on education for children with disabilities and livelihood for women with disabilities. CBM supported Rama to attend AWID and also recently attended the DID meeting in the Philippines. Rama views COSP as an effective platform to learn about the challenges of the CRPD for the national government and then bring those back to the country level and address them. Additionally, the HLPF provides an opportunity to better understand the national implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and a space in which persons with disabilities can engage and intervene, which is not always possible at the national level.

Sebastian Toledo, Director of CONADI Guatemala attended COSP and is our partner in Guatemala. Specifically, CONADI presented the national Guatemalan disability survey – ENDIS 2016 – at the Guatemalan Mission to the UN to DPO representatives, Missions, and others from Latin America. CBM was involved in this survey with technical leadership and financial contribution. COSP provided a platform and space to share the findings and to discuss ways to build upon this work nationally, regionally, and globally.

Global platforms, such as COSP, are instrumental for our work as they provide a space to learn, discuss, and strengthen the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which in turn is further strengthened by the ambitious and transformative 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development which for the first time recognizes persons with disabilities as agents of change for sustainable development. The 11th session of COSP will be held at United Nations Headquarters in New York from 12 to 14 June 2018. Get ready and see you there next year!

Alt="All of the CBM representatives at COSP10"

All of the CBM representatives together at COSP10: Jane Edge, Diane Kingston, Elizabeth Lockwood, Mirjam Gasser, and Sarah Meschenmoser

Alt="Mirjam Gasser, Sarah Meschenmoser, and me in front of the CBM exhibition"

Mirjam Gasser, Sarah Meschenmoser, and me in front of the CBM exhibition

One more step in the global indicator framework

On 7 June, the UN Economic and Social Council formally adopted the global Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) indicator framework at their Coordination and Management Meeting. The next step is that the global framework will be presented at the UN General Assembly for adoption in September, which is needed for full adoption of the framework.

The global indicator framework is important for persons with disabilities, as data collection can provide the number of persons with disabilities living in a location, the barriers they encounter, and what policies and programs are needed to eradicate those barriers. Disaggregation of data by disability is a key step in including persons with disabilities who encounter higher rates of poverty and exclusion from society. The global indicator framework is important at the local and national levels where SDG implementation takes place, and is linked to our CBM programs in the areas of inclusive education, ensuring healthy lives, water and sanitation for all, gender equality, climate change, inclusive cities among other areas.

Furthermore, the framework can be used as a guide for monitoring the SDGs and can be a tool for disability-inclusive development since 11 indicators have references to persons with disabilities. These indicators are in the areas of poverty eradication, education (2 references), employment (2 references), reducing inequalities, sustainable and inclusive cities (3 references), and peaceful and inclusive societies (2 references). In addition, the paragraph on disaggregation includes disaggregation of data by disability.

Each indicator is ranked in a tier system with three tiers:

  • Tier 1: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, and data are regularly produced by countries for at least 50 per cent of countries and of the population in every region where the indicator is relevant.
  • Tier 2: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, but data are not regularly produced by countries.
  • Tier 3: No internationally established methodology or standards are yet available for the indicator, but methodology/standards are being (or will be) developed or tested.

The disability-inclusive indicators are mostly found in Tier III (5) and Tier II (4), with only one in Tier I. There is one indicator that could be in any three of the Tiers depending on the indices.

Stay tuned for updates on the global indicator framework, and know that this is one step closer to ensuring that no one is left behind and building a more inclusive society.

Additional Information

Disability Statistics: Our Place in the Sun