Tag Archives: sustainable development

Dialogues on Sustainable Development: A Disability-Inclusive Perspective

This is written by Charlotte Axelsson.

CBM (International Advocacy and Alliances) is pleased to present its latest publication – Dialogues on Sustainable Development: A Disability Inclusive Perspective.

For many years, CBM has been involved with governments, UN agencies, regional bodies (such as the EU) and civil society in conversations about the importance of disability-inclusive development. Particularly, CBM has focussed on the need to ensure the inclusion of persons with disabilities in international cooperation efforts. The aim of this new publication is to contribute to a better understanding of how different actors involved in sustainable development efforts can take further steps to include persons with disabilities.

This report is a refreshing collection of dialogues around key development themes, which are crucial for the implementation of the recently adopted 2030 Agenda. Guest contributors from the mainstream development sectors of the UN, the European Commission and civil society highlight the many commonalities between disability-inclusive development and a range of overarching development themes. It is structured around the three basic elements of sustainable development – economic, social and environmental sustainability.

“We must ensure that growth is inclusive and leaves no one behind. Actions are needed to that men, women and youth have access to decent work and social protections floors. Labour market policies should put a special focus on young people, women and people with disabilities.” – UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon

The chapter on economic sustainability in this publication echoes Ban Ki-moon’s above statement in the General Assembly in 2014. The implementation of the 2030 Agenda has to combine investment and private sector expansion with making sure that jobs give a genuine chance for people to lift themselves out of poverty. To make sure that all men and women get the chance to access jobs, work places must be accessible and grants and credits must be inclusive of persons with disabilities. This requires accountable and effective public institutions that guarantee human rights, democratic governance and transparency. Furthermore, building strong, accountable and inclusive government institutions through participation, respect for human rights and transparency can better ensure access to services such as education employment, health and social welfare.

“Women’s rights are important for me because I see myself first and foremost as a woman, not as a woman with disability and that’s my identify.” – Ola Abu Alghaib

Ola Abu Alghaib, an expert in disability, gender and development from Palestine, powerfully illustrates the importance of pursuing a positive dialogue between women with disabilities and the wider gender movement. This is one of the themes discussed in the chapter on social sustainability and reflects the need for brining the disability and development sectors closer to each other. Universal health care, inclusive equitable education and women empowerment remain important global goals in the 2030 Agenda. Making sure that men, women, girls and boys with disabilities are guaranteed a quality education and full health care coverage, including necessary rehabilitation, are fundamental for eradicating the social marginalisation and exclusion of persons with disabilities.

“An inclusive city promotes growth with equity. It is a place where everyone, regardless of their economic means, gender, race, ethnicity, disability or religion, is enabled and empowered to fully participate in the social, economic and political opportunities that cities have to offer.”

Ensuring environmental sustainability intersects with all areas of international cooperation. Persons with disabilities are particularly at risk form the effects of climate change, such as natural disaster and food insecurity, as this puts them at greater likelihood of facing economic hardship, illnesses and death. Combined with other environmental risks, such as poor sanitation, water quality and uncontrolled urbanisation, barriers that exclude persons with disabilities are maintained or amplified. The dialogues on environmental concerns in this publication gives powerful examples of how the inclusion and participation of persons with disabilities in WASH programmes ensures dignity and build self-reliance, it brings improvements in health status and nutrition, which facilitate opportunities for education and work. Similarly, a participatory urban planning and disaster risk management can create disability-inclusive and resilient cities, where everyone can benefit from social, economic and political opportunities.

Read the Dialogues on Sustainable Development: A Disability-Inclusive Perspective and join the discussion!

#InclusiveDialogues #2030Agenda

 

Post-2015 Consensus reached with Snapshot in Sign

In the evening of August 2nd at the UN in NY, the “Transforming Our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development” reached consensus by Member States, to be adopted in September at the UN Summit.

The Agenda is people-centred, pledges to leave no-one behind and seeks to ensure, realize and protect the human rights of all.

Australia, Brazil and Ecuador included persons with disabilities in their closing and final national post-2015 statements. Thank you for your unwavering support!

The final document includes persons with disabilities with 11 explicit references (continue reading for details). Particularly strong is the paragraph on people who are vulnerable and must be empowered that references “persons with disabilities (of whom more than 80% live in poverty)” (para 23) putting persons with disabilities in the centre of poverty eradication throughout the Agenda.

Despite the references, some gaps remain and CBM would like to see explicit references to persons with disabilities in the health (para 26) and the gender paragraphs (para 20).

Explicit references to persons with disabilities

Declaration

Human rights (para 19)

Vulnerable groups (para 23)

Education (para 25)

Sustainable Development Goals and targets

Goal 4: education = 2

Goal 8: employment = 1

Goal 10: reduce inequality = 1

Goal 11: inclusive cities = 2

Goal 17: Means of implementation, data = 1

Follow-up and review

Data disaggregation (para 74,g)

Persons with disabilities are also included wherever vulnerable is referenced (18 times) throughout the text in line with paragraph 23. Additionally, there are indirect, yet strong references that include persons with disabilities. These include the following:

Alt="Post-2015 Adoption"

Post-2015 Adoption

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exact Language

Declaration

Para 19

We reaffirm the importance of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, as well as other international instruments relating to human rights and international law. We emphasize the responsibilities of all States, in conformity with the Charter of the United Nations, to respect, protect and promote human rights and fundamental freedoms for all, without distinction of any kind as to race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth, “disability” or other status.

Para 23

People who are vulnerable must be empowered. Those whose needs are reflected in the Agenda include all children, youth, persons with disabilities “(of whom more than 80% live in poverty)”, people living with HIV/AIDS, older persons, indigenous peoples, refugees and internally displaced persons and migrants. We resolve to take further effective measures and actions, in conformity with international law, to remove obstacles and constraints, strengthen support and meet the special needs of people living in areas affected by complex humanitarian emergencies and in areas affected by terrorism.

Para 25

We commit to providing inclusive and equitable quality education at all levels – early childhood, primary, secondary, tertiary, technical and vocational training. All people, irrespective of sex, age, race, ethnicity, and “persons with disabilities”, migrants, indigenous peoples, children and youth, especially those in vulnerable situations, should have access to life-long learning opportunities that help them acquire the knowledge and skills needed to exploit opportunities and to participate fully in society. We will strive to provide children and youth with a nurturing environment for the full realization of their rights and capabilities, helping our countries to reap the demographic dividend including through safe schools and cohesive communities and families.

Sustainable Development Goals and targets

Goal 4: Ensure “inclusive” and equitable quality education and promote life-long learning opportunities for all

4.5 by 2030, eliminate gender disparities in education and ensure equal access to all levels of education and vocational training for the vulnerable, including “persons with disabilities”, indigenous peoples, and children in vulnerable situations

4.a build and upgrade education facilities that are child, “disability” and gender sensitive and provide safe, non-violent, inclusive and effective learning environments for all

Goal 8: Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all

8.5 by 2030 achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and “persons with disabilities”, and equal pay for work of equal value

Goal 10: Reduce inequality within and among countries

10.2 by 2030 empower and promote the social, economic and political inclusion of all irrespective of age, sex, “disability”, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status

Goal 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

11.2 by 2030, provide access to safe, affordable, “accessible” and sustainable transport systems for all, improving road safety, notably by expanding public transport, with special attention to the needs of those in vulnerable situations, women, children, “persons with disabilities” and older persons

11.7 by 2030, provide universal access to safe, “inclusive and accessible”, green and public spaces, particularly for women and children, older persons and “persons with disabilities”

Goal 17: Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development

Systemic issues; Data, monitoring and accountability

17.18 by 2020, enhance capacity building support to developing countries, including for LDCs and SIDS, to increase significantly the availability of high-quality, timely and reliable data disaggregated by income, gender, age, race, ethnicity, migratory status, “disability”, geographic location and other characteristics relevant in national contexts

Follow-up and review

Para 74 (g)

Follow-up and review processes at all levels will be guided by the following principles:

They will be rigorous and based on evidence, informed by country-led evaluations and data which is high- quality, accessible, timely, reliable and disaggregated by income, sex, age, race, ethnicity, migration status, “disability” and geographic location and other characteristics relevant in national contexts.

Indirect references

Declaration

Para 11

We reaffirm the outcomes of all major UN conferences and summits which have laid a solid foundation for sustainable development and have helped to shape the new Agenda. These include the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development; the World Summit on Sustainable Development; the World Summit for Social Development; the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development, the “Beijing Platform for Action”; and the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (“Rio+ 20”). We also reaffirm the follow-up to these conferences, including the outcomes of the Fourth United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries, the “Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States”; the Second United Nations Conference on Landlocked Developing Countries; and the “Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction”.

Means of Implementation

Para 42

We support the implementation of relevant strategies and programmes of action, including the Istanbul Declaration and Programme of Action, the “SIDS Accelerated Modalities of Action (SAMOA) Pathway”, the Vienna Programme of Action for Landlocked Developing Countries for the Decade 2014-2024, and reaffirm the importance of supporting the African Union’s Agenda 2063 and the programme of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD), all of which are integral to the new Agenda. We recognize the major challenge to the achievement of durable peace and sustainable development in countries in conflict and post-conflict situations.

Follow-up and review

Para 47

Our Governments have the primary responsibility for follow-up and review, at the national, regional and global levels, in relation to the progress made in implementing the Goals and targets over the coming fifteen years. To support accountability to our citizens, we will provide for systematic follow-up and review at the various levels, as set out in this Agenda and the “Addis Ababa Action Agenda”. The High Level Political Forum under the auspices of the General Assembly and the Economic and Social Council will have the central role in overseeing follow-up and review at the global level.

Para 54

Sustainable development goals and targets

Following an inclusive process of intergovernmental negotiations, and based on the Proposal of the Open Working Group on Sustainable Development

Goals1, which includes a “chapeau” contextualising the latter, the following are the Goals and targets which we have agreed.

Chapeau

Para 4

People are at the centre of sustainable development and, in this regard, in the outcome document, the promise was made to strive for a world that is just, equitable and inclusive and the commitment was made to work together to promote sustained and inclusive economic growth, social development and environmental protection and thereby to benefit all, in particular the children of the world, youth and future generations of the world, without distinction of any kind such as age, sex, “disability”, culture, race, ethnicity, origin, migratory status, religion, economic “or other status.

Para 17

To monitor the implementation of the sustainable development goals, it will be important to improve the availability of and access to data and statistics disaggregated by income, gender, age, race, ethnicity, migratory status, “disability”, geographic location and other characteristics relevant in national contexts. There is a need to take urgent steps to improve the quality, coverage and availability of disaggregated data to ensure that no one is left behind.

Para 64

We support the implementation of relevant strategies and programmes of action, including the Istanbul Declaration and Programme of Action, the “SIDS Accelerated Modalities of Action (SAMOA) Pathway”, the Vienna Programme of Action for Landlocked Developing Countries for the Decade 2014-2024, and reaffirm the importance of supporting the African Union’s Agenda 2063 and the programme of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD), all of which are integral to the new Agenda. We recognize the major challenge to the achievement of durable peace and sustainable development in countries in conflict and post-conflict situations.

Means of implementation and the Global Partnership

Global level

Para 89

The HLPF will support participation in follow-up and review processes by the major groups and other relevant stakeholders in line with “Resolution 67/290”. We call on these actors to report on their contribution to the implementation of the Agenda.

This Agenda is framework truly for the people and with the mobilization of the people in order to have a transformed planet with a sustainable and empowered society by 2030.

Click here for more information on the post-2015 process.