Tag Archives: Indicators

Update on global SDG indicator framework

On 28 January, the President of the General Assembly held an informal meeting on the global SDG indicators to Member States and Stakeholders. John Pollinger, Chair of UN Statistical Commission presented remotely, as did Enrique Ordaz, IAEG-SDGs CoChair. Also present was Mr. Stefan Schweinfest, Director of the UN Statistics Division.

Member States provided a few interventions, including The United States, Nigeria, Zambia on behalf of landlocked developing countries (LLDCs), India, Venezuela, Morocco, Colombia, and Ecuador. The US stated that there are gaps in the indicators for Goal 16 and pushed that that the process be open and inclusive for stakeholders, including civil society (thank you!) and academia, as well as for Member States. India indicated that Goal 17 is weak on indicators and that there is a risk of low and high political ambition and some indicators go beyond the targets themselves.

Please continue reading for a synopsis on the global SDG indicator process.

Key points

  • The global indicator framework is being put forth to be adopted in March at the 47th Session of the UN Statistical Commission and then be submitted to ECOSOC and the General Assembly for further adoption.
  • A proposal for the global indicator framework will be ready in mid-February for the Statistical Commission to review. In it there will be 229 proposed global indicators: 149 (green) completed indicators, 89 (grey) indicators (marked with an asterisk) are currently being reviewed by the IAEG-SDGs group and will be attached as an addendum.
  • The global indicator framework should be ready for Member States to use in the High-Level Political Forum (HLPF) in July.
  • The High-Level Group (HLG) met two weeks ago in New York and devised a global action plan for data. The focus of the HLG is to build capacity, partnerships and linkages after the global indicators are agreed. (The report is available here.)
  • There will be three tiers of indicators:
    • Tier I: agreed international standards are available and data can be gathered
    • Tier II: standard exists, but data cannot easily be gathered
    • Tier III: international standards are not yet agreed and need to be developed
  • A work plan will be created for Tier III indicators this year on how to proceed.

Indicator framework

  • Global indicators will be the core of all other sets of indicators.
  • Member States will develop indicators at regional, national and sub-national levels to complement the global indicators, taking into account national circumstances.
  • Thematic indicators are also being developed in a number of areas.

Data disaggregation

  • Member States have pledged to leave no one behind.
  • The IAEG-SDGs group is committed to including an overarching principle of data disaggregation to ensure that indicators cover specific population groups and other disaggregation elements specified in the targets (“SDG indicators should be disaggregated where relevant by income, sex, age, race, ethnicity, migratory status, disability’ and geographic location, or other characteristics, in accordance with the Fundamental Principles of Official Statistics.”).
  • Over the coming months, the IAEG-SDGs group will discuss how to operationalize data disaggregation in the implementation of the global indicator set.

Implementation of Global SDG indicator framework

  • Secretary-General’s mandate
    • Produce annual SDG progress report to support follow-up and review at the High-Level Political Forum
  • National ownership
    • Data will be produced by national statistical systems.
    • Information will be aggregated at the sub-regional, regional and global levels.
  • Statistical Capacity Building
    • Statistical capacity building is essential for national statistical systems to meet the demands of the 2030 Agenda.
    • The IAEG-SDGs group and the HLG will work closely together to develop a strategic plan for statistical capacity building.

Work plan of the IAEG-SDGs

  • Define global reporting mechanisms
  • Establish a tier system for indicators based on the level of methodological development and data availability
  • Review of data availability for Tier I and Tier II indicators
  • Create a work plan for further development of Tier III indicators
  • Have procedures for methodological review of indicators
  • Give guidance on data disaggregation
  • Discuss interlinkages across targets and goals, and use of multi-purpose indicators
  • Meet twice in 2016

Upcoming dates

  • 8-11 March, 47th Session of the UN Statistical Commission
  • 30 March to 1 April, Third IAEG-SDGs meeting, Mexico City
    • Discussion on global reporting mechanisms, disaggregation of data, tracking of indicators with a focus on unavailable data, among other topics
  • Fall, 2016, Fourth IAEG-SDGs meeting
  • Later in 2016, World Forum of Sustainable Data

 

Global indicators and inclusion of persons with disabilities

The Report of the Inter-agency and Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goal Indicators (IAEG-SDGs) was published by the UN Statistical Division and released on 6 January. Positively, the report contains 9 global indicators with explicit reference to persons with disabilities and additionally declares disaggregation of data by disability as a core principle.

This report defines the global indicators that intend to measure the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and targets. Global indicators will be highly significant and will be used to inform the annual progress report on the Sustainable Development Goals prepared by the Secretary-General. The data will be collected by the national statistical systems and made available in an international data series maintained by the UN. The report contains a proposal of 231 global indicators, covering all targets of the SDGs. With 80 of the 231 indicators “requiring refinements following further consultation,” an update will be presented in a background document to the Commission. The report will be adopted by the UN Statistical Commission at the 47th session on 8-11 March and afterward will be adopted by the Economic and Social Council of the UN as well as the General Assembly.

A core element of the global indicator framework is the disaggregation of data and the coverage of particular groups in order to fulfill the main principle of the 2030 Agenda of leaving no one behind. The report recommends “SDG indicators should be disaggregated where relevant by income, sex, age, race, ethnicity, migratory status, disability and geographic location, or other characteristics, in accordance with the Fundamental Principles of Official Statistics.”

Global indicators and persons with disabilities

The report contains 9 global indicators explicitly referencing persons with disabilities. All SDG targets that reference persons with disabilities have a corresponding indicator with persons with disabilities, except target 17.18 on data, monitoring and accountability. Moreover, there are two indicators that include persons with disabilities that do not have a corresponding target explicitly referencing persons with disabilities. These are poverty eradication: social protection systems (1.3.1) and peaceful societies: representative decision-making (16.7.1).

Positively, five indicators were added since the first IAEG-SDGs report that was released in June 2015. These are in the areas of education, employment, reducing inequalities, and sustainable cities. Specifically:

  • Education: Percentage of schools with access to…“adapted infrastructure and materials for students with disabilities (4.a.1)”
  • Employment: Average hourly earnings of female and male employees by occupation, by age group and “persons with disabilities” (8.5.1)
  • Reducing inequalities: Proportion of people living below 50 per cent of median income, disaggregated by age group, sex and “persons with disabilities” (10.2.1)
  • Sustainable cities: Proportion of the population that has convenient access to public transport, disaggregated by age group, sex and “persons with disabilities” (11.2.1)
  • Sustainable cities: The average share of the built-up area of cities that is open space for public use for all, disaggregated by age group, sex and “persons with disabilities” (11.7.1)

While the inclusion of persons with disabilities has increased with the updated report, gaps remain. Thus, is imperative that:

  • Data is disaggregated by age, disability, and sex throughout the global indicator framework
  • Indicators still being discussed are completed quickly and transparently, as well as include persons with disabilities,
  • The disaster risk reduction and climate change indicators include persons with disabilities
  • Linkages are established between the global indicators and regional and national indicator platforms
  • Persons with disabilities are included in the health, gender, and WASH global indicators

Important upcoming dates

Indicators explicitly referencing persons with disabilities

Goals and Targets from 2030 Agenda Indicators
Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere

 

1.3 Implement nationally appropriate social protection systems and measures for all, including floors, and by 2030 achieve substantial coverage of the poor and the vulnerable 1.3.1 Percentage of the population covered by social protection floors/systems disaggregated by sex, and distinguishing children, unemployed, old age, “persons with disabilities,” pregnant women/newborns, work injury victims, poor and vulnerable
Goal 4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all

 

4.5 By 2030, eliminate gender disparities in education and ensure equal access to all levels of education and vocational training for the vulnerable, including persons with “disabilities,” indigenous peoples and children in vulnerable situations 4.5.1 Parity indices (female/male, rural/urban, bottom/top wealth quintile and others such as “disability” status, indigenous people and conflict-affected as data become available) for all indicators on this list that can be disaggregated
4.a Build and upgrade education facilities that are child, “disability” and gender sensitive and provide safe, non-violent, inclusive and effective learning environments for all 4.a.1 Percentage of schools with access to (i) electricity; (ii) Internet for pedagogical purposes; (iii) computers for pedagogical purposes; (iv) “adapted infrastructure and materials for students with disabilities;” (v) single-sex basic sanitation facilities; (vi) basic handwashing facilities (as per the WASH indicator definitions)
Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all

 

8.5 By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and “persons with disabilities,” and equal pay for work of equal value 8.5.1 Average hourly earnings of female and male employees by occupation, by age group and “persons with disabilities”
8.5.2 Unemployment rate, by sex, age group and “persons with disabilities”
Goal 10. Reduce inequality within and among countries

 

10.2 By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, “disability,” race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status 10.2.1 Proportion of people living below 50 per cent of median income, disaggregated by age group, sex and “persons with disabilities”

Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

 

11.2 By 2030, provide access to safe, affordable, accessible and sustainable transport systems for all, improving road safety, notably by expanding public transport, with special attention to the needs of those in vulnerable situations, women, children, “persons with disabilities” and older persons 11.2.1 Proportion of the population that has convenient access to public transport, disaggregated by age group, sex and “persons with disabilities”
11.7 By 2030, provide universal access to safe, inclusive and accessible, green and public spaces, in particular for women and children, older persons and “persons with disabilities” 11.7.1 The average share of the built-up area of cities that is open space for public use for all, disaggregated by age group, sex and “persons with disabilities
Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels

 

16.7 Ensure responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all levels 16.7.1 Proportions of positions (by age group, sex, “persons with disabilities” and population groups) in public institutions (national and local legislatures, public service, and judiciary) compared to national distributions

 

 

We are all in the same pot: the importance of disability indicators

Today, the Republic of Korea generously hosted a side event focused on disability indicators. The event was timely because of the second IAEG-SDGs meeting in Bangkok (26-28 October) that will discuss the indicator framework for the monitoring of the Goals and targets of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development at the global level, and to support its implementation. Persons with disabilities must be included in this framework to ensure they are not left behind in the new global agenda.

The event was collaborative with support and organization from the International Disability Alliance (IDA), the International Disability and Development Consortium (IDDC), Sightsavers, UNICEF, UNDESA, and the Missions of the Republic of Korea, Antigua and Barbuda, and Australia.

Member States and groups in attendance included Brazil, Argentina, Finland, Norway, Spain, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Germany, Singapore, Palau, the Bahamas, Pakistan, Jordan, the EU, and CARICOM.

Presenters included Vladimir Cuk, IDA; Dominic Haslam, Sightsavers; Ambassador Aubrey Webson, Antigua and Barbuda; Maria Martinho, UNDESA; Rosangela Berman Bieler, UNICEF, and Ambassador Hahn, Republic of Korea. The presentations were concise, succinct and provided effective examples of disability data collection.

Alt="Presenters at disability indicator side event"

Presenters at disability indicator side event

The Disability Indicators: SDG Advocacy Toolkit – developed in partnership by the UN, IDA and IDDC – was launched at the side event. Broadly, it calls to disaggregate all relevant targets by disability and to use the following disability/persons with disabilities indicators in relation to the Sustainable Development Goals and targets.

Goal 1: End poverty in all its forms everywhere

1.1 – Percentage of persons with disabilities below $1.25 (PPP) per day

1.3 & 10.4 – Percentage of persons with disabilities covered by social protection, or percentage of persons with disabilities receiving benefits

1.5 & 11.5 – Percentage of deaths from persons with disabilities among all deaths due to disasters

– Percentage of injured/missing/ relocated/evacuated persons with disabilities among all injured/missing/ relocated/evacuated due to disasters

Goal 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages

3.2 – Under-five mortality rate for children with disabilities
3.8 – Percentage of persons with disabilities receiving needed health services

– Percentage of persons with disabilities receiving needed assistive technologies
– Proportion of households with persons with disabilities facing catastrophic health expenditure

– Proportion of households with persons with disabilities facing impoverishing health expenditure

 Goal 4: Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all

4.5 – Primary and secondary school net attendance ratio for children with disabilities

– Percentage of teachers in service who have received in-service training in the last 12 months to teach students with special educational needs

4.a – Percentage of schools (primary, lower and upper secondary) with adapted infrastructure and materials for students with disabilities

Goal 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

5.2 – Percentage of women and girls with disabilities subjected to physical and/or sexual violence

5.6 – Percentage of women and girls who make decisions about their own sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights, disaggregated for persons with/without disabilities

Goal 6: Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all

6.1 – Percentage of population using safely managed drinking water services, disaggregated for persons with/without disabilities

6.2 – Percentage of population using safely managed sanitation services, disaggregated for persons with/without disabilities

Goal 8: Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all

8.5 – Unemployment rate, disaggregated for persons with/without disabilities

Goal 10: Reduce inequality within and among countries

10.2

– Percentage of positions in public institutions (national and local legislatures, public service, and judiciary) held by persons with disabilities
– Voting turnout as a share of voting-age population disaggregated by disability

– Percentage of government websites which meet the ISO/IEC 40500:2012 of accessibility for Web content
– Percentage of population owning a mobile phone, disaggregated for persons with/without disabilities
– Percentage of population with disabilities with internet access, disaggregated for persons with/without disabilities

Goal 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

11.2 – Percentage of public transport vehicles meeting the minimum national standards for accessibility by persons with disabilities

11.7 – Percentage of public buildings meeting the ISO 21542:2011 standards on accessibility and usability of the built environment

– Percentage of public green spaces (parks and recreational facilities) meeting the minimum national standards for accessibility by persons with disabilities

Goal 16: Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels

16.9 – Percentage of children under 5 whose births have been registered with civil authority, disaggregated for children with/without disabilities

Goal 17: Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development

17.18 – Percentage of countries with data for all disability related indicators and disability disaggregation of the SDG framework, in the last 5 years

 

Alt="Ambassador Aubrey Webson presenting on disability indicators"

Ambassador Aubrey Webson presenting on disability indicators

 

In closing, the aforementioned disability-focused indicators must be included in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development to be truly inclusive and to leave no one behind. I will end with two powerful quotes from persons with disabilities from today’s event.

 

 

 

 

  • “Disability cannot be just an add-on group as disability is part of our entire existence; we are all in the same pot.” -Ambassador Webson, Antigua and Barbuda
  • “I’m part of a group that has been left behind many times, this cannot happen again.” -Vladimir Cuk, International Disability Alliance

 

Post-2015 follow-up and review update

The intergovernmental negotiations on the post-2015 development agenda were held at the UN in New York on 18-22 May with a focus on follow-up and review of the agenda. Please continue reading below for a summary and key points from the intense week.

The zero draft of the final post-2015 outcome document tentatively will be released on 1 June.

The co-facilitators introduced 21 modified targets. The response from G77 and China (global South) was that they did not want the Open Working Group report to be reopened and thus did not support the tweaking of targets. Conversely, the global North generally supported the “strengthening” of the 21 targets and considered it as improving the sustainable development goals (SDGs).

In NY we continue to push for the inclusion of civil society in the post-2015 development processes. Some countries are very positive about including civil society, while some are not as enthusiastic in this area.

National implementation is largely considered the most important aspect of follow-up and review, while global follow-up and review is viewed as a weaker component. Further, the principle of disaggregating data by disability appears to be accepted at the global level. However, unless data is disaggregated at the national level, it will be difficult to enforce this at regional or global levels.

At this point there is no agreement on the role of the High-Level Political Forum (HLPF). The HLPF as phrased today is not strong enough to handle the global monitoring and thus some Member States would like to strongly strengthen it while others would like the reverse. As persons with disabilities have a seat on the HLPF, it is very important that this becomes a strong and integral global mechanism for the post-2015 implementation.

On the last day of the negotiations the proposed themes for September’s Summit were attacked because of the reference to “vulnerable groups.” Egypt first, followed by many G77 supporters called to replace this term with “people living in vulnerable situations.” It was decided that only theme titles will be sent to the President of the General Assembly for the Summit, but Member States will receive the entire document (which includes persons with disabilities in an opening paragraph).

Alt="Post-2015 negotiations"

Post-2015 negotiations

Persons with disabilities

Persons with disabilities received good visibility during the negotiations. This included Ms. Tiina Nummi-Södergren from MyRight who also was a member of the Swedish delegation to the UN on post-2015. She gave an impassioned presentation at a very well attended side event on civil society participation in the post-2015 process. In addition, Joseph Oye from Sightsavers Cameroon presented on behalf of persons with disabilities, the International Disability and Development Consortium and International Disability Alliance during the interactive dialogue with Major Groups and other Stakeholders. Click here to read his presentation. Throughout the week references to persons with disabilities came from:

  • El Salvador
  • Agnes Leina Ntikaampi, Illaramatak Community Concers, as part of Tebtebba Foundation (Major Gropus for Indigenous Peoples)
  • Arpita Das, Asian-Pacific Resource and Research Centre for Women, as part of Post-2015 Women’s Coalition
  • Betty Wamala Mugabi, Beyond 2015 and World Vision East Africa Region
  • Erlinda Capones, Director of the National Economic Development Authority of the Philippines

Thank you all!

Alt="Tiina Nummi-Södergren from MyRight presenting"

Tiina Nummi-Södergren from MyRight presenting

Indicator framework update

The following points are from the post-2015 indicator framework update from John Pollinger, Chair of UN Statistical Commission (on 21 May):

  • The IAEG-SDG group has been established to develop an indicator framework to monitor the post-2015 at the global level
  • The group has a balanced and fair representation across the world and also has technical expertise
  • The IAEG-SDG will meet for the first time 1-2 June in NY
  • The IAEG-SDG consists of 28 representatives of national statistical offices, regional and international agencies
  • The IAEG-SDG will conduct work in an open, inclusive and transparent manner and will invite civil society, academia and the private sector on relevant experiences on data
  • The UNSD will have briefing sessions with civil society to engage in the process
  • International organizations are asked to provide additional info, and civil society has been encouraged to provide input in the discussion
  • The 1-2 June meeting will set up a process for the development framework, creating interlinkages across targets and agree on the way forward
  • There will have to be larger investments for new data methodologies versus those already established
  • There will be three tiers:
  1. Methodology already established and data exists
  2. Methodology already established, but data not available
  3. International methodology not yet developed
  • Indicators must directly connect to goals and targets and not undermine, must cover all targets, even MOI, and give equal weight to all targets, and no new or contentious issues
  • Global indicators should be limited and be multipurpose
  • It will be challenging for national statistical systems, especially for developing and least developed countries
  • There will be the establishment of a global database for the SDGs, similar to the MDGs indicators. This will be monitored by the UNSD in NY to make sure there are linkages between national statistics. This will be the backbone for national, regional and global reporting for all goals and targets, but not cutting across monitoring of national countries.
Alt="A very rare sight - lights out at the UN from a technical glitch!"

A very rare sight – lights out at the UN from a technical glitch!

Additional information

Click here for the new Sustainable Development Goal Indicators website.

The first meeting of the Inter-Agency Expert Group on SDGs (IAEG-SDGs) will be held in New York from 1-2 June 2015. Click here for additional information. The meeting is expected to be webcast live at webtv.un.org.

Fifth round of post-2015 intergovernmental negotiations